Swansea hornpipe

Also known as The Man From Newry, The Men Of Wrexham’s, Pibddawns Gwŷr Wrecsam, The Swansea.

There are 11 recordings of this tune.

Swansea has been added to 22 tunebooks.

Download ABC

Three settings

1
X: 1
T: Swansea
R: hornpipe
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|:d>c|B2 g2 g>dB>G|c2 e2 e2 g>e|d>Bd>B e>dc>B|A>Bc>A G>FE>D|
G2 g2 g>dB>G|c2 e2 e2 g2|d>Bd>B e>cA>F|G2 G2 G2:|
|:d>c|B>GB>G B2 d2|e>ce>c e2 g2|d>Bd>B e>dc>B|A>Bc>A G>FE>D|
B>GB>G B2 d2|e>ce>c e2 g2|d>Bd>B e>cA>F|G2 G2 G2:|
2
X: 2
T: Swansea
R: hornpipe
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
~ | ABcA GFED | ~ or ~ | AGFE D2 Bc | ~
d2 g2 gdBG | c2 e2 e2 ge | dBdB edcB | ABcA GFED |
d2 g2 gdBd | c2 e2 e2 ge | dBdB ecAF | G2 B2 G2 :|
dBGB d2 gd | ecGc e2 ge | dBdB edcB | AGFE D2 Bc |
dBdB d2 g2 | ecec e2 g2 | dBdB ecAF | G2 B2 G2 :|
3
X: 3
T: Swansea
R: hornpipe
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
d2 b2 b>gd>B | c2 a2 a2 a>g | f>ga>b c'>af>g | (3aba g>e d>cB>c |
d2 b2 b>gd>B | c2 a2 a2 a>g | f>ga>b c'>af>g | (3aba g>f g2 :|
d>Bd>B (3ded g>f | e>ce>c (3efe (3gfe | d>Bd>G e>dc>B | A>B (3cBA G>FE>D |
d>Gd>G d2 g>f | e>Ge>G e2 g>e | d2 (3Bcd e>cA>F | G2 d2 G2 :|
d2 b2 bgdB | c2 a2 a2 ag | fgab c'afg | abge dcBc |
d2 b2 bgdB | c2 a2 a2 ag | fgab c'afg | abgf g2 :|
dBdB d2 gf | ecec efge | dBdG edcB | ABcA GFED |
dGdG d2 gf | eGeG e2 ge | dGBd ecAF | G2 g2 G2 :|

Eight comments

The Swansea Hornpipe

(Swansea is a city on the coast of South Wales, UK).

The Welsh name for this city is Abertawe.

So Welsh speakers might possibly call this tune: "Pibddawns Abertawe".

"Pibddawns Gwŷr Wrecsam" / "The Men Of Wrexham’s Hornpipe"

I’m sure I’ve also come across this one in North American, and in early collections, probably under other names. There and in Cymru/Wales, where it is a tune that gets regular play and for dance, it is more often played straight, without swing, as we’ve known it.

Here is a straight transcription that offers a few other ways you’ll find this one. As one example, I’ve given two different ways you can take it down on bar 4 of parts A & B:

~ | ABcA GFED | ~ or ~ | AGFE D2 Bc | ~

X: 2
T: Pibddawns Gwŷr Wrecsam
T: The Men Of Wrexham’s
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: hornpipe
K: Gmaj
|: Bc |\
d2 g2 gdBG | c2 e2 e2 ge | dBdB edcB | ABcA GFED |
d2 g2 gdBd | c2 e2 e2 ge | dBdB ecAF | G2 B2 G2 :|
|: Bc |\
dBGB d2 gd | ecGc e2 ge | dBdB edcB | AGFE D2 Bc |
dBdB d2 g2 | ecec e2 g2 | dBdB ecAF | G2 B2 G2 :|

I also love it with a jaunty lilt, swung… 😉

"Pibddawns Gwŷr Wrecsam" / "The Men Of Wrexham’s Hornpipe" ~ dance

There is also a simple twmpath dawns (barn dance), a big circle mixer, that has taken the name of this tune…

twmpath - "toom-path" = tump, hilloch
dawns - "down-s" = dance

The dance ~ a simple mixer. I have taken this with some variations, including swung and with hornpipe/fling steps, hop 123s and hop steps…

Formation: a circle of couples

A ~ Circle up, advance and retire twice
AA ~ Circle to the left / CW
B ~ Partners arm right / corners arm left
BB ~ New partners promenade ACW

A version of this and another transcription of this tune can be found in the Eddie Jones book "Dawnsie Twmpath", Y Lolfa, 1987, dance 5, page18…

"Pibddawns Gwŷr Wrecsam" / "The Men Of Wrexham’s Hornpipe" ~

another way with it, high and low ~ swung & not…

X: 3
T: Pibddawns Gwŷr Wrecsam
T: The Men Of Wrexham’s
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: hornpipe
K: Gmaj
|: G>B |\
d2 b2 b>gd>B | c2 a2 a2 a>g | f>ga>b c’>af>g | (3aba g>e d>cB>c |
d2 b2 b>gd>B | c2 a2 a2 a>g | f>ga>b c’>af>g | (3aba g>f g2 :|
|: (3ABc |\
d>Bd>B (3ded g>f | e>ce>c (3efe (3gfe | d>Bd>G e>dc>B | A>B (3cBA G>FE>D |
d>Gd>G d2 g>f | e>Ge>G e2 g>e | d2 (3Bcd e>cA>F | G2 d2 G2 :|

X: 4
T: Pibddawns Gwŷr Wrecsam
T: The Men Of Wrexham’s
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: hornpipe
K: Gmaj
|: G2 |\
d2 b2 bgdB | c2 a2 a2 ag | fgab c’afg | abge dcBc |
d2 b2 bgdB | c2 a2 a2 ag | fgab c’afg | abgf g2 :|
|: Bc |\
dBdB d2 gf | ecec efge | dBdG edcB | ABcA GFED |
dGdG d2 gf | eGeG e2 ge | dGBd ecAF | G2 g2 G2 :|

You are correct, ragaman

You are correct, ragaman.

And since it was me that posted both tunes, I should have realised this, and posted the second one as a variation.

Except that I didn’t. A genuine mistake, I assure you.

Put it down to old age, in my case. Too many tunes buzzing around in my head - I just can’t keep track!

The Man from Newry

I learnt this from O’Neil’s, where it appears as "The Man from Newry". Many years later I heard "The Gloucester Hornpipe" and was surprised it was so familiar. Only when I looked at the sheet music did it suddenly dawn on me that this was the same tune being played in a very different way. I see The Fiddler’s Companion says it appears first in written form as "The Swansea Hornpipe" - in a Scottish Manuscript of the late 18th century. This tune travels well!